1. progressivefriends:
  2. intellectualyouth:

The Poet
  3. socialismartnature:

Baltimore Sun only knows of Israeli soldiers and “others” when counting deaths. Talk about turning Palestinians into the “Other”!

    socialismartnature:

    Baltimore Sun only knows of Israeli soldiers and “others” when counting deaths. Talk about turning Palestinians into the “Other”!

    (Source: twitter.com)

  4. "One of the most sinister things about normalized racism is you don’t have to have bad intentions to be racist, you just have to remain ignorant."
  5. jcoleknowsbest:

gelopanda:

himeroswings:

yearningforunity:

Sisterhood of the Good Death - Bahia, Brazil
Bahia - Brazil. Sisterhood of descendants of slaves who resisted slavery. 
In the Brazilian state of Bahia, about an hour by car from the better-known city of Salvador, lies the historic city of Cachoeira, where the Irmandade de Nossa Senhora da Boa Morte, Sisterhood of Our Lady of the Good Death, holds their annual mid-August festival. Don’t let the name fool you; there is nothing macabre about this celebration. A unique testament to the strength and endurance of the African Diaspora, Boa Morte is a festival of deep cultural, social, spiritual and religious significance, a joyful expression of life, faith and happiness. 
The Sisterhood is said to be the oldest organization for Women of African Descent in the Americas. It is a vestige of African Secret female societies, and began more than 150 years ago in pre-abolition era Brazil. Brazil had more than four times as many Africans imported to its shores as the United States, with the majority entering the country through Bahia.

Brazil had more than four times as many Africans imported to its shores as the United States

^^

4 times… tuh… try around 10 times as many… United States around 400k… Brasil around 4.9 milllion

    jcoleknowsbest:

    gelopanda:

    himeroswings:

    yearningforunity:

    Sisterhood of the Good Death - Bahia, Brazil

    Bahia - Brazil. Sisterhood of descendants of slaves who resisted slavery. 

    In the Brazilian state of Bahia, about an hour by car from the better-known city of Salvador, lies the historic city of Cachoeira, where the Irmandade de Nossa Senhora da Boa Morte, Sisterhood of Our Lady of the Good Death, holds their annual mid-August festival. Don’t let the name fool you; there is nothing macabre about this celebration. A unique testament to the strength and endurance of the African Diaspora, Boa Morte is a festival of deep cultural, social, spiritual and religious significance, a joyful expression of life, faith and happiness. 

    The Sisterhood is said to be the oldest organization for Women of African Descent in the Americas. It is a vestige of African Secret female societies, and began more than 150 years ago in pre-abolition era Brazil. Brazil had more than four times as many Africans imported to its shores as the United States, with the majority entering the country through Bahia.

    Brazil had more than four times as many Africans imported to its shores as the United States

    ^^

    4 times… tuh… try around 10 times as many… United States around 400k… Brasil around 4.9 milllion

    (via note-a-bear)

  6. Israel's media strategy: What lies beneath - How the Israeli government is misleading the world one press conference at a time.»

    Five years ago, US-based “The Israel Project” asked a Zionist Republican pollster, Frank Luntz, to prepare a new updated media guide for “leaders who are on the front lines of fighting the media war for Israel”. The project builds on some of the best examples of Israeli leaders’ own success at mystification, in order to devise a strategy that neutralises Israel’s critics and promotes and improves its media standing.

    It’s a step-by-step guide that underlines “the words that work” and the “words that don’t work” when speaking to westerners. Like any marketing or PR campaign, much of the suggested code words, phrases and sound bites are based on polls.

  7. medievalpoc:

beccabeccalee:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

medievalpoc:

loverandsynner submitted to medievalpoc:

this was taken at the Museum of London, Docklands - it has a large section about London’s role in slavery, and how slavery contributed to modern racism. 

I think that a lot of museums are finally starting to try and take a more proactive stance on how they present their exhibits and information about them.
For more on this kind of arrangement, I high recommend taking a look at these submissions from xanthy-m on the Swedish Historical Museum:



Oh what was that about black ppl in England not being present?
Since BEFORE THE 1500s?
MEANING DURING THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD
So yall “historically accurate” fuckers can be quiet


[source: Egerton Genesis Picture Book, England c. 1375]

Some time ago I went to a presentation by a former thesis advisor about female satire written during the long 18th century (It was titled something awesome like “Could Women Be Funny in the Austen Era?” and was more about the social propriety of women being satirists than about whether women were actually funny). During the Q&A I asked if minorities also had trouble representing themselves as satirists and the answer I got was, “Europe didn’t really have minorities back then.” And that’s when I knew I was asking the wrong person. 

^ And that’s how you erase at least 15,000 people from history.

    medievalpoc:

    beccabeccalee:

    medievalpoc:

    sourcedumal:

    medievalpoc:

    loverandsynner submitted to medievalpoc:

    this was taken at the Museum of London, Docklands - it has a large section about London’s role in slavery, and how slavery contributed to modern racism. 

    I think that a lot of museums are finally starting to try and take a more proactive stance on how they present their exhibits and information about them.

    For more on this kind of arrangement, I high recommend taking a look at these submissions from xanthy-m on the Swedish Historical Museum:

    image

    image

    Oh what was that about black ppl in England not being present?

    Since BEFORE THE 1500s?

    MEANING DURING THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD

    So yall “historically accurate” fuckers can be quiet

    image

    [source: Egerton Genesis Picture Book, England c. 1375]

    Some time ago I went to a presentation by a former thesis advisor about female satire written during the long 18th century (It was titled something awesome like “Could Women Be Funny in the Austen Era?” and was more about the social propriety of women being satirists than about whether women were actually funny). During the Q&A I asked if minorities also had trouble representing themselves as satirists and the answer I got was, “Europe didn’t really have minorities back then.”

    And that’s when I knew I was asking the wrong person. 

    ^ And that’s how you erase at least 15,000 people from history.

  8. equalityandthecity:

    James Baldwin in an interview with Kenneth Clark.

    wocsurvivalkit:

  9. eboni-health-advisor:


    Duane Cramer is a photographer who is a story teller, sharing stories through pictures. This is one of his photos. But you’ll be amazed at what you find out about HIS STORY of being HIV - positive (more here) ——>

    Internationally known, award-winning photographer Duane Cramer has become an advocate for HIV awareness for over two decades after finding out that his best friend died of the disease. His best friend being his father.

    Duane’s dad died of AIDS 27 years ago. Because HIV/AIDS had such a huge stigma back then, the family initially told everyone that his father died of cancer. Duane then started volunteering for various HIV-educational programs.   But he felt like something was missing from the conversation, and that the HIV/AIDS story from a black perspective needed to be told.

    After 10 years of volunteering, Duane contracted HIV himself from a relationship. Both his and his father’s diagnoses fueled his passion to educate the community even more.

    My Story: “My Dad Died From AIDS…& I’m HIV Positive”

    “At first it was only a white gay man’s disease, and those blacks with HIV were left out in the dust.”

    Duane currently encourages people living with HIV to help develop a treatment plan for each other, using his photography and creativity to bring much needed attention to the disease. He has been involved in various campaigns and HIV-education initiatives designed to get people talking about and tested for HIV.  Duane captures social images, and shares those images to incite conversation and tell stories.  Which is appropriate, since Duane sees himself as a professional storyteller. 

    Duane is currently working with Merck on Project I Design, a educational campaign that helps people living with HIV to work with doctors on their own terms.  As a part of the campaign, Duane shares his personal experience to show the importance of a healthy dialogue with doctors and patients.

    “If there’s one thing I want our black community to know is I want people to really be authentic, especially with their doctors. So many times–for whatever reason–we don’t tell our doctors the whole story, which delays accurate diagnosis and treatment. Be real, so you can be healthier. No matter what happens, keep a positive attitude. It’s a value that my family instilled in me and it’s kept me going all these years.” 

    For more information on Duane and Project I Design, click here.

    http://blackdoctor.org/373923/duane-cramer-project-i-design/

    (via empire-of-romyyy)

  10. divalocity:

Model: Nala Diagouraga
Photographer: Michael Mann,Art Director: Mario Lombardo,Hair & Make—up: Anna Neugebauer,Production : Alex Schmidtke,Enver Hadzijaj,Finja Rosenbaum,

    divalocity:

    Model: Nala Diagouraga

    Photographer: Michael Mann,
    Art Director: Mario Lombardo,
    Hair & Make—up: Anna Neugebauer,
    Production : Alex Schmidtke,
    Enver Hadzijaj,
    Finja Rosenbaum,

    (via empire-of-romyyy)

About

Internationally mobile, young woman of African descent. Making her mark on the world.

You’ll know me by my funny blend of London fashion, New York jargon, African ethics, & academic successes.
I am an ethnic mix, e.g. Guinee and Côte d'Ivoire, plus a cultural mutt: American accent, European affect, African ethos. I am multilingual: in addition to English and a Romantic or two, I understand some Fula and Diula and speak Nouchi, an African urban vernacular.

There is at least one place on the African continent to which I tie my sense of self: be it a nation-state (Côte d'Ivoire), a city (Conakry), or an auntie’s kitchen. Then there’s the G8 city or two (or three) that I know like the backs of my hands.

I am an Afropolitan: not a citizen, but an African of the world.