1. "My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhané."
    Quvenzhané Wallis (then age 9) correcting an AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie” instead of learning how to pronounce her name. Never forget.  (via thechanelmuse)

    (via ladyspeechsankofa)

  2. "You are beautiful. Own it. Walk like your hips move mountains."
  3. mailieviney:

    Drum workshop At Groove e.V Zentrum with  Djoniba

    http://www.djoniba.com/

  4. goldcoastghana:

You may recognize this fabric. Its iconic design was created over fifty years ago by Vlisco textile designer Toon van de Manakker, who based the print on a 19th century Ethiopian noblewoman’s tunic. The pattern was originally one of the most important products in the Vlisco range, a beloved best-seller that has been imitated repeatedly since the sixties and continues to be produced to this day.At Vlisco, it is the consumer who names each product, which is why you may know this fabric as ‘Addis Ababa’, ‘Miriam Makeba’, ‘Mashallah’, or may simply refer to it as ‘dashiki print’—after the garment on which it has had its greatest cultural influence. What you may not know, is that one of the most popular names for the fabric, ‘Angelina’, has its roots in 1970s Ghana.In the late seventies, the popularity of the print coincided with the release of the hit song “Angelina” by legendary Ghanaian highlife group The Sweet Talks. People began referring to the printed fabric as ‘Angelina’ (after the similarly vibrant track) and the name has become so popular that even Vlisco now uses it when referring to the iconic print. If you have always wondered why it is they call it ‘Angelina’, now you know!

    goldcoastghana:

    You may recognize this fabric. Its iconic design was created over fifty years ago by Vlisco textile designer Toon van de Manakker, who based the print on a 19th century Ethiopian noblewoman’s tunic. The pattern was originally one of the most important products in the Vlisco range, a beloved best-seller that has been imitated repeatedly since the sixties and continues to be produced to this day.

    At Vlisco, it is the consumer who names each product, which is why you may know this fabric as ‘Addis Ababa’, ‘Miriam Makeba’, ‘Mashallah’, or may simply refer to it as ‘dashiki print’—after the garment on which it has had its greatest cultural influence. What you may not know, is that one of the most popular names for the fabric, ‘Angelina’, has its roots in 1970s Ghana.

    In the late seventies, the popularity of the print coincided with the release of the hit song “Angelina” by legendary Ghanaian highlife group The Sweet Talks. People began referring to the printed fabric as ‘Angelina’ (after the similarly vibrant track) and the name has become so popular that even Vlisco now uses it when referring to the iconic print. If you have always wondered why it is they call it ‘Angelina’, now you know!

    (via thefemaletyrant)

  5. gradientlair:

fyblackwomenart:

At The Cafe by YellowRoseDBS

I love this!

    gradientlair:

    fyblackwomenart:

    At The Cafe by YellowRoseDBS

    I love this!

    (via sway33)

  6. Black owned natural hair products/companies »

    elegantly-tasteless:

    ravingsbya-woc:

    ravingsbya-woc:

    This is just a reminder that a lot of our natural hair products and lines are owned by white companies and they really don’t care about us, so buy black, it actually goes back into our community!

    Black owned:

    Non black:

    • African pride 
    • Soft& Beautiful Botanicals
    • Care free curl
    • Dark and lovely Au naturale
    • Motions naturally you
    • Dr. Miracle’s Curl Care
    • Sof n’ Free Gro Healthy Nothing But
    • ORS curls unleashed (Organic root stimulator)
    • Pantene truly natural
    • Naturally Silk Elements

    There are so many more that can be added to each list. Bottom line, help black business. And an added bonus to helping our community out is a lot of the lines are more natural or Vegan. 

    More black owned natural hair additions, cus why not?

    More non-black owned

    Support black business!

    Carol’s daughter is no longer black owned??

    Wow.

    A lot of shit makes sense now.

    (via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

  7. afrikanwomen:

Queen Tin Hinan
Tin Hinan is the name given by the Tuareg to a 4th-century woman of prestige whose monumental tomb is located in the Sahara at Abalessa in the Ahaggar or Hoggar region of Algeria. The name means literally “she of the tents”, but may be metaphorically translated as “mother of the tribe” (or “of us all”) or even “queen of the camp” (the “camp” maybe referring to the group of tombs which surround hers). She is sometimes referred to as “Queen of the Hoggar”, and by the Tuareg as tamenoukalt which also means queen.

    afrikanwomen:

    Queen Tin Hinan

    Tin Hinan is the name given by the Tuareg to a 4th-century woman of prestige whose monumental tomb is located in the Sahara at Abalessa in the Ahaggar or Hoggar region of Algeria. The name means literally “she of the tents”, but may be metaphorically translated as “mother of the tribe” (or “of us all”) or even “queen of the camp” (the “camp” maybe referring to the group of tombs which surround hers). She is sometimes referred to as “Queen of the Hoggar”, and by the Tuareg as tamenoukalt which also means queen.

    (via equalityandthecity)

  8. humansofnewyork:

"My family made me come. But I hate it. I can’t get a job because I have a lot of accent. I was an assistant manager at a big jewelry store in the Dominican Republic, now I clean tables. We had a big house there. Now we live in a small apartment. If I was home right now, I’d be in a very nice restaurant, on the beach, laughing with my friends. Not sitting alone on a bench, trying to learn English. There I was a princess. Here I am an immigrant. A servant."

    humansofnewyork:

    "My family made me come. But I hate it. I can’t get a job because I have a lot of accent. I was an assistant manager at a big jewelry store in the Dominican Republic, now I clean tables. We had a big house there. Now we live in a small apartment. If I was home right now, I’d be in a very nice restaurant, on the beach, laughing with my friends. Not sitting alone on a bench, trying to learn English. There I was a princess. Here I am an immigrant. A servant."

  9. "A white student may feel discomfort when it’s pointed out to him how he has benefited from structural racism, but to compare that discomfort to discrimination is a false equivalency. Hurt feelings hurt, but it is not oppression. But hurt feelings can be bad for business. And a lot of powerful people think colleges should act more like businesses. When they do, students act more like customers. And our likely customers might not be amicable to discussions about structural racism. If the customer is always right, then the majority share of customers is more right than the minority."

    Minneapolis professor Shannon Gibney: Reprimanded for talking about racism. (via sociolab)

    Capitalism, as a system of oppression, is dependent and interlinked with White Supremacy. We have to overthrow both systems if we want liberation.

    (via stoicmeditations)

    (via cakeandrevolution)

About

Internationally mobile, young woman of African descent. Making her mark on the world.

You’ll know me by my funny blend of London fashion, New York jargon, African ethics, & academic successes.
I am an ethnic mix, e.g. Guinee and Côte d'Ivoire, plus a cultural mutt: American accent, European affect, African ethos. I am multilingual: in addition to English and a Romantic or two, I understand some Fula and Diula and speak Nouchi, an African urban vernacular.

There is at least one place on the African continent to which I tie my sense of self: be it a nation-state (Côte d'Ivoire), a city (Conakry), or an auntie’s kitchen. Then there’s the G8 city or two (or three) that I know like the backs of my hands.

I am an Afropolitan: not a citizen, but an African of the world.